Safety Tips

Simple changes that could save your life

Brought to you by the Faribault Firefighters. An average of three children a day - approximately 1,100 children under the age of 15 - die each year in house fires. Ninety percent of fire deaths involving children occur in homes without smoke detectors. Smoke detectors are relatively inexpensive. The Faribault Fire Department recommends that you install smoke detectors on every level of your home, including one in every bedroom and one outside sleeping areas.
  • Bedroom doors should be kept closed while sleeping. The doors and walls of your home provide an excellent fire and smoke barrier to protect you in the event of a fire. When possible remember to close doors to prevent fire and smoke from entering the room.
  • Smoke detectors become ineffective after ten years. If your smoke detectors are ten years old or older, it is time to have them replaced.
  • Although nearly 92 percent of American homes have smoke alarms, nearly one-third don't work because of worn or missing batteries. The Faribault Fire Department recommends that you replace batteries in battery operated smoke alarms twice a year. A good way to remember this is during daylight savings time. When you change your clock remember to change the batteries in your smoke detector.
  • Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in a home fire nearly in half. Many people with hearing difficulties are left unprotected in their homes because they are unable to hear the smoke alarm. Special smoke alarms are available that use a visual strobe to alert a person with difficulty hearing. If you can not hear your smoke alarm, contact the Faribault Fire Department for more information on strobe smoke alarms. 334-8773.
  • Keep a working flashlight near your bed, in the kitchen, basement, and family room and use it to signal for help in the event of a fire.
  • Always remember to keep matches and lighters stored in a safe place. Many children have a curiosity about fire and can easily start a fire when they find these items. Talk to your children about the danger of playing with fire.
  • Never store gasoline containers inside your home. Escaping vapors are heavier than air and easily find ignition sources such as pilot lights.
  • Children should know what to do during a fire and how to get help in an emergency. Children may not know what to do if a smoke alarm goes off in your home. Sound the alarm in your home and explain to them what you expect them to do in a fire. Every family should take time to talk to young children about an Exit Drill In The Home. Exit drills are simple plans of escape from fire. Children have a natural response of hiding when they are scared. In a fire, hiding is the worst thing they can do. If you teach them what to do, crawling low under the smoke and to go to a designated meeting place outside the home, children will have an excellent chance of surviving a fire. Children also should be taught what to do if the parents become trapped in the home.
  • Fire and Building Codes are designed to protect you in the event of a fire. In your building or home, take time to learn where fire exits are. A fire escape may be a window. There should always be two ways out of a building.
  • Smoke alarms are a family's best defense against fire. Many families become frustrated from false alarms. Many of these false alarms can be eliminated by proper placement. Proper placement is on the ceiling, however, if a wall must be used, install the detector(s) at a minimum distance of 4" and a maximum distance of 12" from the ceiling. Keep smoke detectors away from cooking vapors to prevent false or nuisance alarms.
  • When you clean your home remember that your smoke detector gathers dust and cobwebs. These can make the smoke detector falsely activate or not activate at all. While vacuuming your home, take the time to use your extension to vacuum around the opening of your smoke detector.
  • Know how to escape a fire. Plan your escape paths from each room in your home. Identify two escape paths from each room in your home. If smoke is in your first path, use your second option. If heat, flames, or smoke block both escape paths, stay in the room with your door closed. If there is a telephone in the room, call 9-1-1 and give your location. Signal for help!
  • Don't keep emergency personnel in the dark when you need help. In Faribault, many address numbers are in poorly lighted areas. Trees and other landscaping make it difficult to read an address. Tonight take the time to look at your house numbers. Could emergency personnel find you home easily? Seconds count during every emergency so help us find you in an emergency.
  • Place your address by your phone. Babysitters, guests, or young children may need to call for help in your home. They usually do not know your address and may not know your phone number. Make it easier for them in an emergency. Place your address and phone number on or by your phone. If you need a 9-1-1 sticker for your phone you may pick one up for free at the Faribault Fire Department.
  • Does everyone in your family know what to do if your clothes start on fire? Stop, Drop, and Roll. If somebody else has their clothes start on fire, help them, have them Stop, Drop, and Roll and use a blanket to smother the flames. Never leave children unsupervised around open flames.
  • Careless cigarette smoking starts many home fires. Are ashtrays large enough so that a forgotten cigarette will fall in? Ashes should be discarded in metal wastebaskets only, ideally outside the home. Do not smoke in bed. Remember careless smoking is still a major cause of home fires.
  • The Faribault Fire Department recommends that you have one U.L. listed all purpose fire extinguisher in your home, car, and boat. Having a fire extinguisher available in the event of fire can save your property from needless fire loss.
  • Do you know how to use a fire extinguisher? Remembering the acronym PASS may help. P = Pull the Pin. A = Aim at the base of the fire. S = Squeeze the trigger. And S = Sweep the extinguishing agent back and forth at the base of the fire.
  • Practice fire safety in your kitchen. Does everyone in your home know to "Put a Lid on It" on grease fires?
  • The Faribault Fire Department wants to remind you to check that your portable heaters in your home be kept away from people, curtains, and furniture. Keep portable heaters a safer distance from flammable materials.
  • Knowing how and when to use a fire extinguisher is very important because it can save property. Knowing when not to fight a fire is just as important. You should never fight a fire if you will have to breathe the smoke. Smoke contains many poisonous chemicals that due harm to your body. It never makes sense to put you life at risk to fight a fire involving property that can be replaced.
  • Never fight a fire if: -The fire is spreading beyond the spot where it started. -You can't fight the fire with your back to an exit for escape -The fire can block your only escape -You don't have adequate fire-fighting equipmentIn any of these situations, don't fight the fire by yourself.Call for help form the fire department quickly.
  • Take the time to do a home electrical inspection. Are there enough outlets so that multiple attachments are not used to overload the outlet? Are extension cords the same size or larger that the appliance they are used with? Are frayed cords and broken plugs replaced? If a fuse blows, do you always look for the cause and replace it with the correct size? If you have problems, contact a qualified electrician to do the repairs and prevent electrical fires.
  • A U.L. approved CO (Carbon Monoxide) detector should be placed in every home. Carbon Monoxide is a silent killer because it is colorless and odorless. Without a working CO alarm you probably will not notice CO poisoning. CO poisoning effects your judgement and coordination. The symptoms are very much like that of the common flu. This is why it is important to place a CO detector in you home. Possible sources of Carbon Monoxide:
    • Unvented kerosene and gas space heaters
    • Leaking chimneys and furnaces
    • Back drafting from furnaces
    • Malfunctioning gas water heaters
    • Wood stoves and fireplaces
    • Gas stoves
    • Automobile exhaust from cars in attached garages

  • The Faribault Fire Department recommends that you have your heating equipment checked and cleaned every year. This simple step will help to maintain a safe furnace and prevent Carbon Monoxide from gathering in the home.
  • If you burn wood in a fireplace or a stove, remember to clean your chimney regularly. Creosote buildup can cause a chimney fire. Chimney fires can be very dangerous and the smoke often backs up in the home causing extensive smoke damage. These problems can easily be prevented by regular chimney inspections and cleaning.
  • Not every fire extinguisher is a multi-purpose fire extinguisher. Multi-purpose fire extinguishers can be used on any type of fire and are very popular. Unfortunately they can leave a mess after the fire is extinguished. Some extinguishers work better that a multi-purpose extinguisher in certain situations, so you may encounter different types. Identify and become familiar with the fire extinguishers in your home or at work. Types of Fire Extinguishers:
    • Class A: Extinguish ordinary combustibles like paper or wood by cooling the material below it's ignition temperature and soaking the fibers to prevent re-ignition. Use pressurized water, foam or a multi-purpose extinguisher for these types of fires. Do not use carbon dioxide or ordinary (BC rated) dry chemical extinguishers in Class A fires.
    • Class B: Extinguish flammable liquids, greases, or gases by removing oxygen, preventing the vapors from reaching the ignition source or inhibiting the chemical chain reaction. Foam, carbon dioxide, ordinary (BC rated) dry chemical, multi-purpose dry chemical, and halon extinguishers may be used to fight Class B fires. Do not use pressurized water to fight Class B type fires.
    • Class C: Extinguish energized electrical equipment by using an extinguishing agent that is not capable of conducting electrical currents. Carbon dioxide, ordinary (BC type) dry chemical, multi-purpose dry chemical and halon fire is widely used, EPA legislation is phasing it out of use. Do not use water extinguishers on energized electrical equipment.

  • What would you do if your home caught fire? Would you know where to do if smoke or flames blocked your escape? There is no time to think about these questions in a real fire. It's hot, smoky, and so dark that you may not be able to see your own hands. Know ahead of time what to do if there's a fire. Develop an escape plan with two ways out of every room. You'll need a second way in case smoke or flames block your primary exit. And make sure every exit is accessible, including windows. Getting out is your first priority in a fire. And once out, stay out!
  • Real fires are hot, smoky and dark. You may have only a very few minutes to safely escape from a fire. If you're ever in a fire, don't spend time getting dressed or trying to gather valuables. Just get out and stay out. Then call the fire department from a neighbor's telephone.
  • Keep a well-stocked first aid kit (including ipecac syrup) in your home. Make sure everyone in your home know where to find it and how and when to use the items in it.

Recomendaciones contra el Fuego

Cambios simples que podrían salvar su vida por los Bomberos de Faribault. Un promedio de tres niños por día –aproximadamente 1,100 niños menores de 15 años- mueren cada año en incendios de hogares. El noventa porciento de las muertes en incendios involucrando a niños ocurren en viviendas sin detectores de humo. Los Detectores de humo son relativamente baratos. El Departamento de Bomberos de Faribault recomienda que usted instale Detectores de Humo en cada nivel de su hogar, incluyendo uno en cada dormitorio y uno fuera de las áreas de los mismos.
  • Las puertas de los dormitorios deben mantenerse cerradas mientras se duerma. Las puertas y las paredes de su hogar proveen una excelente barrera para el humo y el fuego para protegerlo en el evento de un incendio. Cuando sea posible recuerde cerrar las puertas para prevenir que el fuego y el humo entren a su dormitorio.
  • Los Detectores de Humo dejan de funcionar luego de diez años. Si sus Detectores de Humo tienen diez o más años de uso, ya es tiempo de que los reemplace.
  • A pesar de que casi el noventa y dos por ciento de los hogares en Estados Unidos tienen Alarmas de Humo, casi un tercio no funcionan por tener baterías gastadas o no tenerlas. El Departamento de Bomberos de Faribault recomienda que usted cambie las baterías de sus Detectores de humo que así lo requiera, por lo menos dos veces por año. Una buena manera de recordar esto es haciéndolo al mismo tiempo que el cambio de horario. Cuando cambie la hora de su reloj recuerde cambiar las baterías en sus detectores.
  • Las alarmas de humo en funcionamiento reducen el riesgo de morir en un un incendio a la mitad. Muchas persona con dificultades auditivas son dejadas sin protección en sus hogares porque son incapaces de escuchar las alarmas de humo. Hay muchas alarmas disponibles que utilizan una alerta visual para notificar a las personas con dificultades auditivas. Si usted no puede escuchar su alarma de humo, contacte al Departamento de Bomberos de Faribault para obtener más información sobre dichas alarmas.
  • Mantenga una linterna funcional disponible cerca de su cama, en la cocina, el sótano y cuarto de familia y utilícela para señalar ayuda en el evento de un incendio.
  • Siempre recuerde mantener fósforos y encendedores guardados en un lugar seguro. Muchos niños sienten una curiosidad por el fuego y pueden iniciar incendios cuando encuentran estos elementos. Hable a sus niños acerca del peligro de jugar con el fuego.
  • Nunca guarde contenedores de gasolina dentro de su hogar. Los vapores de escape son más pesados que el aire y fácilmente encuentran ignición en fuentes como llamas piloto.
  • Los niños deberían saber qué hacer en un incendio y cómo obtener ayuda en una emergencia. Puede que los niños no sepan qué hacer si una alarma de humo se activa en su hogar. Hágala sonar y explíqueles lo que espera que hagan en un incendio. Toda familia debe tomarse el tiempo de hablar a los niños acerca de las maneras de evacuar su hogar. Las maneras de evacuar son planes simples de escape de un incendio. Los niños tienen una respuesta natural de esconderse cuando se sienten asustados. En un uncendio, esconderse es lo peor que pueden hacer. Si les enseña qué hacer, gatear por debajo del humo e ir a un punto de encuentro fuera del hogar, los niños tendrán una oportunidad excelente de sobrevivir a un incendio. También se les debe enseñar qué hacer si sus padres resultan atrapados entre la vivienda.
  • Los Códigos de Fuego y Construcción están diseñados para protegerlo en el evento de un incendio. En su edificación u hogar, tómese el tiempo de conocer dónde están las salidas de emergencia. Una salida de emergencia puede ser una ventana. Siempre debe haber al menos dos maneras de salir del Edificio en una emergencia.
  • Las Alarmas de Humo son la mejor defensa que una familia pueda tener contra los incendios. Muchas familias se frustran por falsas alarmas. Muchas de estas falsas alarmas pueden ser eliminadas situándolas bien. Su ubicación debe ser en el techo, sin embargo, si una pared debe usarse, instale los detectores a un distancia mínima de 4” y máxima de 12” del techo. Mantega los detectores de humo alejados de los vapores de cocción para prevenir alarmas falsas o molestas.
  • Cuando asee su hogar recuerde que los detectores de humo reúnen polvo y telarañas. Estos pueden hacer que el Detector de Humo se active falsamente o no se active en absoluto. Mientras aspire su hogar tomese el tiempo de utilizar su extensión para aspirar alrededor de las aperturas del Detector de Humo.
  • Sepa como escapar a un Incendio. Planee su ruta de escape desde cada dormitorio en su hogar. Identifique dos rutas de escape desde cada dormitorio en su hogar. Si el humo se encuentra en su primera ruta, utilice la segunda opción. Si el calor, las llamas o el humo bloquean ambas salidas, quédese en el dormitorio con la puerta cerrada. Si hay un teléfono en la alcoba llame al 9-1-1 y dé su locación. ¡Señale pidiendo Ayuda!
  • No mantenga al personal de emergencia en la oscuridad cuando necesite ayuda. En Faribault muchos números de direcciones están en áreas pobremente iluminadas. Árboles y otros paisajes hacen difícil la lectura de las direcciones. Esta noche tómese el tiempo de mirar los números de su casa. ¿Puede el personal de seguridad encontrar su casa fácilmente? Los segundos cuentan durante toda emergencia así que ayúdenos a encontrarlo en una emergencia.
  • Sitúe su dirección junto a su teléfono. Niñeras, invitados o niños pequeños pueden necesitar llamar por ayuda en su casa. Usualmente no conocen su dirección y pueden no conocer su número de teléfono. Hágalo más fácil para ellos en una emergencia. Sitúe su dirección y número de teléfono en o cerca de su teléfono. Si necesita un adhesivo del 9-1-1 para su teléfono puede tomar uno del Departamento de bomberos sin costo alguno.
  • ¿Saben todos los miembros de su familia qué hacer en caso de que se incendien sus ropas? Pare, Bótese y Ruede. Si a alguien más se le prenden las ropas, ayúdelo, hágalo Parar, Botarse y Rodar y utilice una cobija para apagar las llamas. Nunca deje niños sin supervisión cerca de llama abiertas.
  • Fumar cigarrillos descuidadamente inicia mucho incendios. ¿Son los ceniceros lo suficientemente grandes para que un cigarrillo olvidado caiga adentro? Las cenizas deben ser descartadas únicamente en canecas metálicas, idealmente fuera del hogar. No fume en la cama. Recuerde que fumar cigarrillos descuidadamente sigue siendo la mayor causa de incendios en el hogar.
  • El departamente de bomberos de Faribault recomienda que usted tenga un extinguidor enlistado U.L. para todos los propósitos (U.L. listed all purpose fire extinguisher) en su casa, carro y bote. Tener un extinguidor disponible en el evento de un incendio puede salvar su propiedad de pérdida innecesaria.
  • ¿Sabe cómo utilizar un extinguidor? Recordar las siglas PASS (HAAB) puede ayudar. P= Pull (Hale el pin). A= Aim (Apunte a la base del fuego). S= Squeeze (Apriete el gatillo). Y S= Sweep (Barra la totalidad del fuego con el agente extintor).
  • Practique la seguridad contra incendios en su cocina. ¿Saben todos en su casa “ponerle una tapa” a los fuegos causados por grasas?
  • El Departamento de Bomberos quiere recordarle que revise que los sistemas de calefacción portátiles en su hogar se mantengan lejos de la gente, las cortinas y los muebles. Mantenga los sistemas de calefacción portátil a una distancia segura de los materiales combustibles.
  • Saber cómo y cuándo utilizar un extinguidor es muy importante porque puede salvar propiedad. Saber cuándo no combatir un fuego es igualmente importante. Nunca debería tener que combatir un fuego cuando tenga que inhalar el humo. El humo contiene muchos químicos tóxicos que le hacen daño a su cuerpo. Nunca tiene sentido arriesgar su vida para combatir un fuego que involucre propiedad que puede ser reemplazada.
  • Nunca combata el fuego si: -El fuego se esparce más allá del punto en el que comenzó. –No puede combatirlo con su espalda hacia una salida de escape. – El fuego puede bloquear su única sálida de escape. –No tiene equipo adecuado. En cualquiera de estas situaciones no combata el fuego por usted mismo. Llame al Departamento de bomberos rápidamente para solicitar ayuda.
  • Tómese el tiempo para hacer una inspección eléctrica. ¿Hay suficientes enchufes de manera que no se necesiten multitomas que sobrecarguen el enchufe? ¿Son los cables de extensión del mismo tamaño o más grandes que el aparato con el cual son utilizados? ¿Han sido los cables derretidos y los enchufes rotos reemplazados? ¿Si se ha explotado un fusible, siempre busca el motivo y lo reemplaza con el tamaño correcto? Si tiene problemas contacte a un electricista profesional para hacer los reparos y prevenga incendios eléctricos.
  • Detectores de CO (Mnoxido de Carbono) aprovados por la A.U.L. deben ponerse en toda casa. El Monóxido de Carbono es un asesino silencioso ya que es incoloro e inodoro. Sin una alarma funcional de CO usted probablemente no notará envenenanmiento por CO. El envenenamiento por CO afecta su juicio y coordinación. Los síntomas son muy parecidos a los de la gripe común. Por esto es importante que usted ponga un detector de CO en su hogar.
  • Fuentes posibles de Monóxido de Carbono: -Calentadores de Keroseno o Gas que no estén ventilados –Escapes en chimeneas u hornos -Calentadores de agua de gas defectuosos –Estufas y chimeneas de madera –Estufas de gas –Exosto de automóviles en garajes adjuntos.
  • El Departamento de Bomberos de Faribault recomienda que limpie y revise su equipo de calefacción cada año. Este paso sencillo le ayudará a mantener la seguridad y prevenir que se genere Monóxido de Carbono en el hogar.
  • Si usted quema madera en una chimenea o estufa, recuerde limpiarla regularmente. Acumulaciones de creosota pueden causar un incendio en la chimenea. Los incendios de chimeneas pueden ser muy peligrosos y el humo usualmente se acumula en el hogar causando daños extensivos. Estos problemas pueden fácilmente prevenirse con inspecciones y limpiezas regulares de la chimenea.
  • No todo extinguidor de fuego es un extinguidor multi-propósitos. Los Extinguidores multi-propósitos pueden ser utilizados en cualeuir tipo de fuego y son muy populares. Desafortunadamente pueden dejar un reguero luego de extinguir el fuego. Algunos extinguidores funcionan mejor que un Extinguidor multi-propósito en ciertas situaciones, así que usted puede encontrar muchos tipos. Identifique y familiarícese con los tipos de extinguidores en casa y en el trabajo. Tipos de Extinguidores de Fuego:
    • Clase A: Extinguir combustibles ordinarios como papel o madera enfriando el material por debajo de su temperatura de encendido y empapapando las fibras para prevenir el re-encendido. Use extinguidores de agua a presión, espuma o multi-propósitos para estos tipos de incendios. No utilice diócido de carbono o estinguidores odrinarios (clasificación BC) de químico seco en incendios tipo A.
    • Clase B: Extinguir líquidos inflamables, grasas o gases removiendo el oxígeno, previniendo que los vapores alcancen la fuente de encendido o inhibiendo la reacción química en cadena. Extinguidores de espuma, dióxido de carbono, ordinarios (clasificaión BC) de químico seco, multi-propósito de químico seco y extinguidores de “halon” pueden utilizarse para combatir fuegos tipo B. No utilice agua a presión para fuegos tipo B.
    • Clase C: Exinguir equipo de energía eléctrica utilizando un agente incapaz de conducir corrientes eléctricas. Extinguidores de dióxido de Carbono, ordinarios (clasificación BC) de químico seco, multi-propósito de químico seco y de fuego “halon” son comúnmente utilizados, la legislación EPA lo está sensurando. No utilice extinguidores de agua en equipo de energía eléctrica.

  • ¿Qué haría usted si su casa se incendia? ¿Sabría qué hacer si sus salidas son bloqueadas por humo o llamas? No hay tiempo para pensar en estas cuestiones en un incendio real. Es caliente, hay humo, y es tan oscuro que puede que no esté en capacidad de ver sus propias manos. Sepa antes de tiempo qué hacer en un incendio. Desarrolle un plan de escape con dos maneras de salir de cada alcoba. Necesitará una segunda manera en caso de que el humo o las llamas bloqueen su primera salida. Asegúrese de que todas las salidas son accesibles, inclusive las ventanas. Salir es su primera prioridad en un fuego. Y una vez afuera, ¡Quédese afuera!
  • Los verdaderos incendios son calientes, llenos de humo y oscuros. Puede que tenga tan solo unos minutos para escapar de una manera segura de un fuego. Si alguna vez se ve atrapado en un incendio no desperdicie tiempo tratando de vestirse y reunir objetos valiosos. Sólo sálgase y quédese afuera. Después llame al Departamento de Bomberos desde un teléfono vecino.
  • Mantenga un Botiquín de Primeros Auxilios bien equipado (incluyendo ipecac) en su hogar. Asegúrese de que todos en su casa sepan dónde encontrarlo y cómo y cuándo utilizar las herramientas dentro de él.

Web Development by Livefront, a Minneapolis Web Design firm.